Fuck Yeah Warrior Women
comicsalliance:

STEEL YOURSELF FOR MATT FRACTION & CHRISTIAN WARD’S ‘ODY-C’ WITH THIS PROLOGUE THAT WILL NOT BE IN THE COMIC
By Matt D. Wilson
When it was announced back in January, we knew three things about ODY-C, the new Image series by writer Matt Fraction and artist Christian Ward: It was a retelling of The Odyssey, would take place in space, and the characters would all be gender-swapped.
What wasn’t as clear was just how trippy and brutal it would be, but if the five-page prologue Ward posted to his Tumblr last week is indicative of what the whole series will be like, those are the words to describe it.
Ward was sure to note that these pages won’t appear in the first issue of ODY-C, so get a good look at the prologue — with its positively luminous color palette, sometimes unorthodox panel layouts, and one big scene of someone getting sliced in two with a sword — now.
READ THE PROLOGUE AT COMICS ALLIANCE

comicsalliance:

STEEL YOURSELF FOR MATT FRACTION & CHRISTIAN WARD’S ‘ODY-C’ WITH THIS PROLOGUE THAT WILL NOT BE IN THE COMIC

By Matt D. Wilson

When it was announced back in January, we knew three things about ODY-C, the new Image series by writer Matt Fraction and artist Christian Ward: It was a retelling of The Odyssey, would take place in space, and the characters would all be gender-swapped.

What wasn’t as clear was just how trippy and brutal it would be, but if the five-page prologue Ward posted to his Tumblr last week is indicative of what the whole series will be like, those are the words to describe it.

Ward was sure to note that these pages won’t appear in the first issue of ODY-C, so get a good look at the prologue — with its positively luminous color palette, sometimes unorthodox panel layouts, and one big scene of someone getting sliced in two with a sword — now.

READ THE PROLOGUE AT COMICS ALLIANCE

inspirationofelves:

Military Nurse by AyyaSap
dreadpiratekhan:

A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  
(freakin’ immaculate)
Source with more wonderful photos

dreadpiratekhan:


A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  

(freakin’ immaculate)

Source with more wonderful photos

saveroomminibar:

The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings. Triss concept and render and Environment Art.

reality-breaker:


Derek Herring
karethdreams:

(via 'The LEGO Super Friends Project', A Line of Feminine LEGO Friends Minifigs Turned Into Superheroines by Jon Lazar)
Okay, that is really awesome, and if they actually made these I would buy every last one of them for my girls.

karethdreams:

(via 'The LEGO Super Friends Project', A Line of Feminine LEGO Friends Minifigs Turned Into Superheroines by Jon Lazar)

Okay, that is really awesome, and if they actually made these I would buy every last one of them for my girls.

A Voice In The Dark is on Lifesupport

larime:

I have to admit, I’m frustrated. Sales on the book continue to drop and there doesn’t seem to be much I can do to stop it. I’ve tried everything I can.

I got a big-name voice actor to do my trailer. 

Download Video as MP4

I got national news coverage

I switched the book to color.

image

Nothing seems to be working.

It’s a critically acclaimed series, with an average of 8.9 out of 10 over 59 reviews. It’s good. I say that without a hint of arrogance. It really is a good series.

So the conclusion I’m coming to is that people really don’t want female-led books. Unless it’s Harley Quinn, Wonder Woman or Batgirl.

They really don’t want characters of color, racial diversity, or LGBT representation. 

What I’m learning is that I should be drawing and writing books about dudes and the oversexed badgirls they fool around with. I can’t make a living doing what I’m doing, so why not sell out, right? That’s where the money is.

Except I really DON’T believe that. I BELIEVE in what I’m doing. I believe that there’s an audience for it.

It’s time for that audience to step up.

CALL or GO INTO your local comic shop and order the trade. The order number is APR140534. Don’t get it at Amazon, tell your comic book store there are readers. Monthlies aren’t sold on Amazon, and monthlies are how I make a living.

CALL or GO INTO your local comic shop and order the first two issues of the next volume. The order numbers are JUL140458, and AUG140691. 

If you really want to see more diversity in comics, it starts with supporting the books that are already trying to make a difference. I’m not the only one. RACHEL RISINGGENIUS, CONCRETE PARK and many other great books about strong women and people of color are out there and they need your support.

Without it, we’ll have to close up shop.

rantmuffin:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.
And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.
So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3

!!!!!
NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!
This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)
Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

“you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”
I LITERALLY SAID “YES!” at this point
THIS IS SO AWESOME

rantmuffin:

gayonthemoon1239:

rifa:

actualbloggerwangyao:

alvaroandtheworld:

ultrafacts:

Source For more posts like this, follow Ultrafacts

THE BEGINNINGS OF KAWAII

No, no, you have no idea. It actually IS the beginning of the whole so-called “kawaii culture”. And it started because girls started using mechanical pencils, which provided fine handwriting. After being banished (more precisely, during the 80s), this kind of writing started being used in products like magazines and make-up. And, during this time, icons we usually associate with the whole kawaii industry (like the characters from Sanrio) came to life too.

And what many people don’t realize is that this subculture was born as a way for young girls to express themselves in their own way. And it was also used as something against the adult life and the traditional culture, often seen as dull and boring and oppressive. By embracing cuteness, these young girls (and adult women, after a while) were showing non-conformation with the current standards.

So yep. Kawaii is important, and it all started with cute, simple handwritting a few hearts and cat faces in some girls’ school notebooks <3


!!!!!

NO OK THIS IS SO IMPORTANT!

This is also how the kawaii fashions started! Girls began dressing in cute and off beat styles for themsleves, they were criticized by adult figures telling them “you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

All the japanese subcultures and fashions that evolved out of this became a rebellion to tradition and the starch gender roles and expectations the adults were forcing on the younger generations. As early as the 70s and still to this day you’ll see an emphasis on child-like fashion and themes in more kawaii styles and the dismissal of the male gaze with styles like lolita (a lot of western people assume lolita is somehow sexual due to the name of the fashion, but ask any japanese lolita and they will tell you that men hate the style and find it unattractive which is sometimes a large reason they gravitate towards the style - they can express their femininity and individuality while remaining independent and without the pressure to appeal to men)

Its so so so important to understand the hyper cute and ‘odd’ fashions of Japanese girls carry such a huge message of feminism and reclaiming of their own lives.   

so are you telling me that Japan’s punk phase was really the kawaii phase

“you’ll never find a husband if you dress that way!” to which they began to reply “Good!”

I LITERALLY SAID “YES!” at this point

THIS IS SO AWESOME

adedrizils-shrine:

Blue Flame by NathanParkArt