Fuck Yeah Warrior Women
Marvel Comics, the MCU, and Raising the Bar of what Fans Expect

marlowe-tops:

I think it’s significant that Marvel raised the bar. When Iron Man came out in 2008, it significantly changed our cultural standards for superhero movies. And then Marvel kept doing it. Each movie that came out in the MCU seemed better than the last. The female characters were far more than just love interests. The movies weren’t just about superpowered battles and cackling supervillains. Marvel’s movies talked about significant real world issues. They were about questions of military privatization, or cultural appropriation, or government surveillance. We learned to trust Marvel and to look forward to each new movie where the female characters were scientists and CEOs who had better things to do than to worry about their own romantic subplots.

In 2012, Kelly Sue DeConnick blew everyone away with her run of Carol Danvers, and some really amazing things happened. Marvel got a huge new contingent of new fans, mostly female, calling themselves the Carol Corps. And there was a lot of talk about what a huge deal this was, for anything to bring in new comic fans in this quantity. There started to be an outpouring of people talking about how they’d always wanted to get into comics but they felt like they weren’t welcome. (This isn’t to in any way discredit the incredible female fans and creators who long predated Captain Marvel’s 2012 run—let me tell you of my infinite love for anything written by the incomparable Gail Simone.) Captain Marvel changed that, and Marvel paid attention.

In 2013, catering to their new huge demographic of female fans, Marvel Comics put out a couple of all-female teams: the X-Men and the Fearless Defenders, neither of which had ever traditionally been all-female teams. X-Men continues strong, with a multi-ethnic all-female team. Fearless Defenders got canceled after a year due to poor readership, but surprisingly that didn’t discourage Marvel from continuing to cater to its new female demographic.

In 2013 and 2014, Captain Marvel’s run continues, and we’ve got a new Ms. Marvel who is a Muslim-American teenage girl getting fantastic readership and reviews. Black Widow’s got a new run going strong, Elektra and Storm are headlining their own titles, the new writer of Winter Soldier says that ‘feminism’ will be one of the title’s main themes, and the announcement of a new female Thor has sent a whirlwind through the industry. I’ve probably forgotten a few things because Marvel Comics is currently putting out so much worth being excited about for its female fans.

Marvel has been consistently raising the bar since 2008, in both their movies and their comics. There is a vast, varied and passionate fan following that has exploded in the wake of the new direction that Marvel has gone within their industry, both in movies and in comics. Millions of people who may not have known who Iron Man was in 2008 are now dedicated fans of all things Marvel. I’m one of them.

Which is why the backlash against Marvel’s refusal to put out a female-led superhero movie is just so angry and passionate. We got used to Marvel raising the bar. We learned to trust Marvel, and in many ways that peaked in April 2014 when Captain America: The Winter Soldier came out, with a female co-star who was not a romantic interest, for a movie that totally blew away the numbers at the box office, coinciding with many of the exciting things mentioned above going on in Marvel Comics.

Marvel raised the bar and people responded. Their fanbase expanded exponentially, their profits rocketed. But we’ve reached a point where the obvious next step to raise the bar again is to produce a female-led superhero movie that’s on par with the rest of the MCU canon, and Marvel—namely president Kevin Feige—is refusing. It isn’t that Feige’s stance has changed in any way in order to bring on this increasingly massive outpouring of frustration and demand for a female-led superhero movie. It’s that we’ve learned to expect that Marvel will raise the bar.

Guardians of the Galaxy didn’t do that. It was a fun movie, which had a lot of great things about it, but it didn’t raise any bars. And I don’t think anyone is expecting Ant-Man to raise any bars. The heads of Marvel have assumed that, at least when it comes to the MCU, its fan following is due to Marvel’s ability to put out great superhero movies. But the truth is that the MCU’s massive success and popularity is largely attributed to its ability to raise the bar of what people expect from superhero movies. And if you become known for raising the bar, that’s not a topic where you can rest on your laurels.

Female-led action movies like Hunger Games (or starring Scarlett Johansson in particular, like Lucy) make bank. Women purchase 52% of movie tickets and 46% of comics. There’s a market. There’s a demand. There’s a massive and vocal audience telling you exactly what they want you to produce.

C’mon, Marvel. Renew our faith in you. Raise the bar.

bobbimorsebarton:

vylla-art:

Bobbi Morse: Mockingbird - 12/46

This would be so easy to adapt for the show.

bobbimorsebarton:

vylla-art:

Bobbi Morse: Mockingbird - 12/46

This would be so easy to adapt for the show.


Young Avengers: Cassie Lang / Stature
Are you an avenger? Nope, but I’m gonna be.

Young Avengers: Cassie Lang / Stature

Are you an avenger? Nope, but I’m gonna be.

comfortandadam:

This is the rough of our auction piece for Heroes Con hosted by the amazing Heroes Aren’t Hard To Find in Charlotte.And it was only after much thought and consideration (almost did a Batman image, almost did Wonder Woman through the ages…almost did a lot of things) we settled on doing a big Marvel and DC ladies image. Much like our Disney Princesses image we did last year we wanted something that anyone could be proud to hang on their wall!We hope everyone likes it, the final will be full marker 20x32. Very epic indeed!

comfortandadam:

This is the rough of our auction piece for Heroes Con hosted by the amazing Heroes Aren’t Hard To Find in Charlotte.

And it was only after much thought and consideration (almost did a Batman image, almost did Wonder Woman through the ages…almost did a lot of things) we settled on doing a big Marvel and DC ladies image. Much like our Disney Princesses image we did last year we wanted something that anyone could be proud to hang on their wall!

We hope everyone likes it, the final will be full marker 20x32. Very epic indeed!

lulubonanza:

Lady Sif by Fredbenes

chlorinefriday:

image

So it looks like a lot of people saw Days of Future Past this weekend and realized Mystique is awesome. Or even if you already knew that I figured it would be good to make a rec list of comics if anyone wanted to see a little more of her!

Since she’s been around since the 70’s it’s kind of hard to figure out where to start reading for her, especially since even though there’s some really good lists of her appearances it’s really hard to tell what she’s actually a major part of (and even harder to tell if things are terrible).

Obviously this is just my opinion and there’s a lot more than this but I think this is a pretty good list to start! If you want recs for a specific period/event/relationship/child thought feel free to ask and I’ll try to make up something more specific for you!

Read More

alicexz:

Blink! I wanted to draw her as soon as I left the theater!! AND OMG IT’S FAN BINGBING more of this pls

alicexz:

Blink! I wanted to draw her as soon as I left the theater!! AND OMG IT’S FAN BINGBING more of this pls

ucarim:

the thing that’s the most irritating, or predictable perhaps, about shulkiegate is this prevailing argument that the superheroines created in decades past cannot be feminist or even real characters because they were created by sexist creators for a sexist market. it’s the same logic that says susan storm is weak because she’s a wife and mother, that janet van dyne is frivolous because she designs clothing, that jean grey didn’t do much in those early years because her codename included the word “girl.”

because putting all of your current prejudices and misogyny into a box and shoving it back three or five decades is so much easier than admitting you might be wrong, and you might be grossly underestimating what women are capable of.

others have already put it better than i can, but jennifer walters, at her core, isn’t a male fantasy—she’s a female one. she does what bruce banner has never been able to do— she turns power and rage into confidence and conviction. the hulk might be a hero, but the core of his stories is what he gives up, humanity-wise, to reign in his powers. shulkie may be big and green, but she has a successful civilian career, friendships that carry over between her life as jennifer and she-hulk, and a rocking sex life that includes consensual one-night stands and long-term relationships.

in essence— jennifer gets to have what bruce doesn’t, and i’d argue a large part of her ability to reign in the mindless rage we associate with hulkishness is because she’s a woman. she’s well-versed in accepting all parts of herself, rather than denying them. and a woman who doesn’t want to limit herself to one label, or cowtow to male expectations? yeah, i can definitely see why goyer was threatened by a character like that.

just look at the upcoming man of steel sequel— it’s called batman v superman. the versus, the conflict, is inherent in the title. male fantasties glorify conflict, they give us events like avx and the rebooted justice league, that sell copies based off of how hard batman can punch superman or cyclops can blast captain america. and that isn’t to say that every story with that premise is worthless, but the fact remains that we’ve seen them before, ad nauseum.

i think that idea resonates with the hulk— he’s always mad. anger is his strength and also his weakness. violence is frequently his answer, because while bruce banner has a brain and can use it for heroic ends, it’s far more likely to open a comic and find the hulk punching away a problem.

jennifer walters straddles both lines. she can be the muscle, she can punch out a bad guy. she frequently does, but she can also deliver a flippant one-liner, negotiate her way out of a problem, or take you to the cleaners in court.

i don’t care that jennifer walters premiered in 1980. or that wonder woman came on the scene in 1941. women were vocal then, and they’re vocal now. they were part of the audience then, and they are now. using a timeline as an excuse for your perceptions of a character is lazy and quite frankly disgusting.

saying that jennifer walters exists to be fucked says a lot more about the speaker’s sexual fantasies than jennifer herself. surprise, surpise— a woman can enjoy sex, and be a lawyer, and be a hero, and be a hulk. it seems like these days it’s the male heroes who are limited to one thing— punching their way out of their problems.

plus, shulkie’s had the answer to this argument for years:

image

so the alarming thing is, really, that goyer’s position in the industry makes him relevant, when his opinions shouldn’t be.

queendane:

Where to start reading Jessica Drew?
Starting from her first appearance in Marvel Spotlight #32 (1971) then let’s continue on with
The Avengers vol 1 #187
Marvel Two-In-One (1974) #29-33, 85
Spider-Woman volume 1
Marvel Team-Up vol 1 #97
Avengers Annual #10
Heroes For Hire (1997) #18-19
Spider-Woman vol 3
Alias #19-21
Giant-Size Spider-Woman #1
New Avengers vol 1 #48-64 Annual 3
Spider-woman Origin (2006) (* very very very important)
Secret Invasion arc
Spider-Woman vol 4
Mighty Avengers #12, 29-31
New Avengers Vol 2. #1, 12 13, 14-16 24, 28, 33-34
Ms. Marvel vol 2 #1, 36, 41-42
Fear Itself arc
She-Hulk: Sensational #1
Captain Marvel vol. 7  #6, 9, 12-16
Avengers: The Enemy Within 
Avengers Assemble vol. 2
Avengers vol. 5
Captain Marvel vol. 8 #1
Also check out Black Widow and the Marvel Girls #1. In Marvel Now! she’s currently in the Secret Avengers team and has been in several Superior Spider-man issues.

queendane:

Where to start reading Jessica Drew?

Starting from her first appearance in Marvel Spotlight #32 (1971) then let’s continue on with

  • The Avengers vol 1 #187
  • Marvel Two-In-One (1974) #29-33, 85
  • Spider-Woman volume 1
  • Marvel Team-Up vol 1 #97
  • Avengers Annual #10
  • Heroes For Hire (1997) #18-19
  • Spider-Woman vol 3
  • Alias #19-21
  • Giant-Size Spider-Woman #1
  • New Avengers vol 1 #48-64 Annual 3
  • Spider-woman Origin (2006) (* very very very important)
  • Secret Invasion arc
  • Spider-Woman vol 4
  • Mighty Avengers #12, 29-31
  • New Avengers Vol 2. #1, 12 13, 14-16 24, 28, 33-34
  • Ms. Marvel vol 2 #1, 36, 41-42
  • Fear Itself arc
  • She-Hulk: Sensational #1
  • Captain Marvel vol. 7  #6, 9, 12-16
  • Avengers: The Enemy Within 
  • Avengers Assemble vol. 2
  • Avengers vol. 5
  • Captain Marvel vol. 8 #1

Also check out Black Widow and the Marvel Girls #1. In Marvel Now! she’s currently in the Secret Avengers team and has been in several Superior Spider-man issues.

asieybarbie:

Nicole Beharie as Monica Rambeau

Oooh, so pretty.