Fuck Yeah Warrior Women
shadowrun:


@catalystgamelab We have another Shadowrun photo, this time with a custom cyberarm. Feel free to share! pic.twitter.com/VG6rUKOJgD
— AveryCloseCall (@AveryCloseCall)
September 9, 2013

shadowrun:

heroineimages:

Twi’lek Explorer, by Tony Foti
With all of the focus on civil wars, epic battles, and galactic politics, it’s easy to forget that there is also exploration and adventure to be found throughout the Star Wars Universe. I was immediately reminded of this fact when I first ran across this thrill-seeking Twi’lek lass on Tony’s Facebook page. While I haven’t gotten her name or phone number (yet), I do know that she’s from Enter the Unknown, an expansion book from Edge of the Empire, by Fantasy Flight Games.
(Click for further discussion)

heroineimages:

Twi’lek Explorer, by Tony Foti

With all of the focus on civil wars, epic battles, and galactic politics, it’s easy to forget that there is also exploration and adventure to be found throughout the Star Wars Universe. I was immediately reminded of this fact when I first ran across this thrill-seeking Twi’lek lass on Tony’s Facebook page. While I haven’t gotten her name or phone number (yet), I do know that she’s from Enter the Unknown, an expansion book from Edge of the Empire, by Fantasy Flight Games.

(Click for further discussion)

tits-mcgeek:

poisonnv:

theknightlycynic:

Just a little Mara Jade appreciation post. 

Servant. Agent. Warrior. Jedi. Wife. Mother. But always a badass. 

Unf. I will be her one of these days damnit. It will be done!

I fucking love this woman.

fantasy-scifi:

Stalker
by !BrenochAdams

fantasy-scifi:

Stalker

by !BrenochAdams

clubjade:

rjmart:

Oldest pic I’m putting up here. Probably should have uploaded it first, huh? Ooops. Mara Jade, of Star Wars fame, and one of my favs.
© 2008

Yes, it’s the catsuit, but I always liked this one.

clubjade:

rjmart:

Oldest pic I’m putting up here. Probably should have uploaded it first, huh? Ooops. Mara Jade, of Star Wars fame, and one of my favs.

© 2008

Yes, it’s the catsuit, but I always liked this one.

[ Image: A b&w drawing of a woman sitting on a block of concrete, hair obscuring one of her eyes beneath her mid 20th Century era flying cap. She wears a leather jacket — decorated with badges, feathers, and a gas mask hanging from one shoulder — armoured pants, and gloves with a pair of blades attached to the back. A shot gun lies across her knees while lying at her feet is a large dog wearing a gas mask with a stick of dynamite hanging from its collar. ]
Basically, a gender-flipped version of the titular characters from the classic post-apoc film A Boy And His Dog.

[ Image: A b&w drawing of a woman sitting on a block of concrete, hair obscuring one of her eyes beneath her mid 20th Century era flying cap. She wears a leather jacket — decorated with badges, feathers, and a gas mask hanging from one shoulder — armoured pants, and gloves with a pair of blades attached to the back. A shot gun lies across her knees while lying at her feet is a large dog wearing a gas mask with a stick of dynamite hanging from its collar. ]

Basically, a gender-flipped version of the titular characters from the classic post-apoc film A Boy And His Dog.

[ Image: A light skinned woman wearing the uniform — furlined jacket, white scarf, leather flying cap with square-lensed goggles — of a WWII military aviator. ]
inmaledress:

coolchicksfromhistory:

During World War II, over a thousand women served as Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) in the US.  The goal of the WASP program was to free male pilots for combat duty by enlisting female pilots for transport duty and service as test pilots.  Although they enlisted and served under Army command, these women were not granted military status until 1977.  Not only were they ineligible for military benefits until that point, the thirty eight WASP pilots killed while on duty were not even transported home by the government. 
The WASP program was not strictly whites only, two Chinese American women served.  However, no black women served and at least one black woman was rejected for service as a WASP based on her race.  Sherri L. Smith uses this information to build a fictional story about a pilot named Ida Mae Jones who passes as white in order to join the WASP.   In Flygirl, two historic themes are intertwined, the challenges of women joining Uncle Sam’s Army in World War II and the repercussions of a person of African ancestry pretending to be white in the Jim Crow South. 
I’m interested in the WASP program, so this book had immediate appeal for me as a reader of historical fiction.  The outline of the book isn’t as exciting as most military fiction since Ida Mae is never involved in combat, but Sherri L. Smith does a good job at keeping the reader engrossed in the challenges Ida Mae faces as a trainee, a pilot, and a black woman passing.  Flygirl is a young adult novel, so it is a pretty quick read and a good choice for younger readers.  
Flygirl on Amazon

[ Image: A light skinned woman wearing the uniform — furlined jacket, white scarf, leather flying cap with square-lensed goggles — of a WWII military aviator. ]

inmaledress:

coolchicksfromhistory:

During World War II, over a thousand women served as Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASP) in the US.  The goal of the WASP program was to free male pilots for combat duty by enlisting female pilots for transport duty and service as test pilots.  Although they enlisted and served under Army command, these women were not granted military status until 1977.  Not only were they ineligible for military benefits until that point, the thirty eight WASP pilots killed while on duty were not even transported home by the government. 

The WASP program was not strictly whites only, two Chinese American women served.  However, no black women served and at least one black woman was rejected for service as a WASP based on her race.  Sherri L. Smith uses this information to build a fictional story about a pilot named Ida Mae Jones who passes as white in order to join the WASP.   In Flygirl, two historic themes are intertwined, the challenges of women joining Uncle Sam’s Army in World War II and the repercussions of a person of African ancestry pretending to be white in the Jim Crow South. 

I’m interested in the WASP program, so this book had immediate appeal for me as a reader of historical fiction.  The outline of the book isn’t as exciting as most military fiction since Ida Mae is never involved in combat, but Sherri L. Smith does a good job at keeping the reader engrossed in the challenges Ida Mae faces as a trainee, a pilot, and a black woman passing.  Flygirl is a young adult novel, so it is a pretty quick read and a good choice for younger readers.  

Flygirl on Amazon

[ Image: An image of the iconic Smuggler character from the Star Wars: the Old Republic MMPORPG. A pale-skinned woman with shoulder length brown hair, she wears a pair of grey-trimmed black spacer’s boots, blue-black pants, a white longsleeved shirt unbuttoned enough to reveal her khaki undershirt, a black vest, and a pair of gauntlets. She wears a brown leather belt decorated with metallic items and fitted with two thigh straps for her hand guns, one of which she’s holding in her left hand. A pair of night vision goggles are perched on her head. The close-up that forms part of the image background revels that she has brown eyes and a liking fo lilac eyeshadow. ]

[ Image: An image of the iconic Smuggler character from the Star Wars: the Old Republic MMPORPG. A pale-skinned woman with shoulder length brown hair, she wears a pair of grey-trimmed black spacer’s boots, blue-black pants, a white longsleeved shirt unbuttoned enough to reveal her khaki undershirt, a black vest, and a pair of gauntlets. She wears a brown leather belt decorated with metallic items and fitted with two thigh straps for her hand guns, one of which she’s holding in her left hand. A pair of night vision goggles are perched on her head. The close-up that forms part of the image background revels that she has brown eyes and a liking fo lilac eyeshadow. ]