Fuck Yeah Warrior Women

secondlina:

Valor: A fairy tale anthology about courageous heroines starts today!

Valor is a comic anthology of re-imaged fairy tales showcasing the talent of some of the top creators in the field of digital comics. The purpose of this book is to pay homage to the strength, resourcefulness, and cunning of female heroines in fairy tales. Some of these are recreations of time-honored tales. Others are brand new stories, designed to be passed to future generations.

The anthology will be young adult friendly and in color, each story being 4 to 15 pages long.

PLEASE CHECK OUT THE KICKSTARTER PAGE TO SEE OUR LIST OF AWESOME CREATORS AND OUR FANTASTIC REWARDS!

CLICK HERE for the Kickstarter

CLICK HERE for the official tumblr.

superdames:

Fun fact: Rosie the Riveter majored in jiu-jitsu in college. ;-)
alternateworldcomics:

Rosie the Riveter as seen in War Victory Adventures from Harvey Comics.

superdames:

Fun fact: Rosie the Riveter majored in jiu-jitsu in college. ;-)

alternateworldcomics:

Rosie the Riveter as seen in War Victory Adventures from Harvey Comics.

superdames:

Announcing the Superdames Comics Contest - CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS
Do you want to create comics but have no idea where to start? Are you an aspiring comics writer or artist who’s looking for a chance to collaborate with others on a fun and uplifting project? Do you want to celebrate awesome female characters?
WELL THEN LET’S DO IT TOGETHER MY FRIENDS.
Announcing the first-ever Superdames Comics Contest — starring Jill Trent, Science Sleuth! We’ll select four writers and five artists to produce five stories, five pages each, to be published in an anthology-style comic focusing on this public-domain character!
Everything you need to know is here:
Superdames.org/contest — download the full rules & guidelines (including reference links for Jill Trent), submission agreement, sample script, and info forum for questions and all that jazz!!
Submissions will be accepted through August 1, 2014!
About Jill Trent, Science Sleuth: Jill Trent is an inventor and freelance detective who solves crimes and beats up gangsters with the help of her scientific knowledge and her faithful life partner, Daisy Smythe! She first appeared in The Fighting Yank #6 (1943), followed by The Fighting Yank #9 (1944) and Wonder Comics #8-20 (1946-48).
Tumblr tag: Superdames Comics Contest
THIS IS REALLY HAPPENING, MY FRIENDS.

superdames:

Announcing the Superdames Comics Contest - CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Do you want to create comics but have no idea where to start? Are you an aspiring comics writer or artist who’s looking for a chance to collaborate with others on a fun and uplifting project? Do you want to celebrate awesome female characters?

WELL THEN LET’S DO IT TOGETHER MY FRIENDS.

Announcing the first-ever Superdames Comics Contest — starring Jill Trent, Science Sleuth! We’ll select four writers and five artists to produce five stories, five pages each, to be published in an anthology-style comic focusing on this public-domain character!

Everything you need to know is here:

  • Superdames.org/contest — download the full rules & guidelines (including reference links for Jill Trent), submission agreement, sample script, and info forum for questions and all that jazz!!
  • Submissions will be accepted through August 1, 2014!

About Jill Trent, Science Sleuth: Jill Trent is an inventor and freelance detective who solves crimes and beats up gangsters with the help of her scientific knowledge and her faithful life partner, Daisy Smythe! She first appeared in The Fighting Yank #6 (1943), followed by The Fighting Yank #9 (1944) and Wonder Comics #8-20 (1946-48).

Tumblr tag: Superdames Comics Contest

THIS IS REALLY HAPPENING, MY FRIENDS.

ruckawriter:

pizza-party:

justingreenwood:

image

STUMPTOWN returns as an ongoing book in September and it’s now featured in the July issue of PREVIEWS from onipress! Couldn’t be more excited to be working on this book and looking forward to getting it into your collective hands.

From the online solict:

STUMPTOWN V3 #1: THE CASE OF THE KING OF CLUBS

Things never go according to plan for Dex Parios—it doesn’t matter whether it’s work or play. When a weekend of soccer fun (both playing and watching!) turns ugly, it’s up to Dex to get to the bottom of the violence before a heated rivalry transforms into an all out war!

It’s got them Ryan Hillbo Baggins colors, so you know it’s gon’ be good!

GO AND GET ORDER NOW PLEASE YES GOOD THANK YOU SOCCER DEX PORTLAND RCTID LITTLE FISHING VILLAGE TO THE NORTH VIOLENCE GUNS DEX HAS SEX JUSTIN DRAWS GREAT THE MUSTANG MAY SURVIVE CK IS BADASS YOU DON’T KNOW WHO SHE IS AND ANSEL IS ADORKABLE.

batlesbo:

secondlina:

Fairy Tales do not inform children that there is such things as monsters. Children already know that there are monsters. What Fairy Tales really teach is that monsters can be transformed or destroyed.

- Paraphrasing G.K. Chesterton

The Namesake team has been hard at work : we’ve been secretly plotting to launch an anthology Kickstarter in August. and THIS is the first official announcement!

Introducing Valor - a fairy tale anthology about courageous heroines produced by a team of amazing fairy-tale loving creators!

Valor is an anthology of re-imaged fairy tales showcasing the talent of some of the top creators in the field of digital comics. The purpose of this book is to pay homage to the strength, resourcefulness, and cunning of female heroines in fairy tales. Some of these are recreations of time-honored tales. Others are brand new stories, designed to be passed to future generations.

The anthology will be young adult friendly and in color, each story being 4 to 15 pages long.

WHO IS THE TALENT :

+ Morgan Beem - Ink Wielder Extraordinaire

+ Meaghan Carter - Creator of Take Off

+ Kadi Fedoruk - Creator of Blindsprings

+ Megan Kearney - Creator of the Beauty and the Beast

+ Isabelle Melançon - Co-creator of Namesake

+ Laura Neubert - Lover of all things revolutionnary

+ Emily Hann - Composer of backgrounds

+ Sara Goetter - Creator of the short comic Haircut

+ Annie Stoll - Creator of Ode

+ Michelle Krivanek - Creator of Alice and the Nightmare

+ Nicole Chartrand - Creator of Feywinds

+ Jayd Ait-Kaci - Creator of Small Town Witch

+ Justin Lanjil - Master of colors

+ Ran Brown - Creator of The End

+ Angelica Maria Lopez - Creator of Solstoria

We also have an amazing writing team working with some of the artists and writing prose :

+ Megan Lavey-Heaton - Co-creator of Namesake

+ Tim Ferrera - Writer of Ode

+ Alex Singer - Author of Sfeer Theory

+ Joanne Webster - Forger of words

OK SO I NEED THIS. WHEN IS THE KICKSTARTER?

Launch is scheduled for August 1st, follow this tumblr, or the numerous’ artists tumblr, or the #valor anthology tag for more information.

:o

northstarfan:

invisiblelad:

kurtiswiebe:

This happened today.
Rat Queens being turned into an animated series by Weta and Heavy Metal. I am stoked.

This might be the best news I’ve heard all day month ever. 

OH HELL YES!

WOOT!

northstarfan:

invisiblelad:

kurtiswiebe:

This happened today.

Rat Queens being turned into an animated series by Weta and Heavy Metal. I am stoked.

This might be the best news I’ve heard all day month ever. 

OH HELL YES!

WOOT!

Heroines of the Comics for Drew Friedman’s perusal

ladiesmakingcomics:

I was recently made aware of Drew Friedman’s upcoming Heroes of the Comics, coming out in August, featuring full-color portraits and profiles of important comic book creators from the 1930s through the 1950s. My initial reaction was some delight, because Fantagraphics put up a picture of Lily Renée’s profile, and that’s always good when people remember her. But of course my delight was tempered the more I read on. The table of contents in the preview lists only two other women in addition to Renée, Marie Severin and Ramona Fradon (misspelled ‘Fraden’), out of 84 people. The summary on the back of the book says, “Featuring subjects popular and obscure, men and women, as well as several pioneering African-American artists.” When women make up 3.5% of your list, (and “several” African-Americans = 2 of them), you’re almost better off not trying to pass them off as a selling point of the book.

What makes this list all the more disappointing is that Friedman himself stated at MoCCA Fest that he felt it was important to profile creators overlooked by both fans and people in the industry, specifically citing Bill Finger. Of course, lists like this are always going to cause some kind of debate over inclusions and omissions, and I understand this book isn’t just about introducing people to forgotten creators, but the people who know Bill Finger was the real creator of Batman still vastly outnumber the people who have even heard of Lily Renée.

Bearing all that in mind, here is my list of women who could have been in this book.

Elizabeth Holloway Marston

image

Friedman features the team of Superman’s creators, Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster, as a single entity (#8), so why is Wonder Woman co-creator William Moulton Marston (#24) all on his own? Elizabeth’s contributions to the creation of Wonder Woman are well-documented. And if you wanted to be thorough, you could include the Marstons’ third partner, Olive Byrne, as the inspiration for Wondy’s metal bracelets!

Virginia Hubbell

image

No Golden Age comics history is complete without mentioning #22 on Friedman’s list, Charles Biro and his lurid Crime Does Not Pay. Until recently (with David Hajdu’s The Ten-Cent Plague) however, no one mentioned that most of “Biro’s” stories were actually by a young woman known as “Ginny”. Her colleagues Pete Morisi and Rudy Palais praised her as a superior creator to Biro. Palais even said that “Charlie couldn’t do what she did in a million years.”

Ray Hermann

image

Hermann (aka Rae or Ruth) was a publisher, editor, writer, (and possibly penciller and inker) whose career spanned fron 1940 to 1955. Her company, Orbit Publications, was a founding member of the Association of Comic Magazine Publishers, for which she served as Secretary and Board Director. The ACMP was founded in response to the rising anti-comics sentiment in the United States, creating the first Publication Code for policing the content in comics, but comics were not subject to formal review to use their seal of approval, and it was largely ignored, but its Publication Code formed the backbone of the later Comics Code. She was also one of the few “advice columnists” in romance comics who was actually a woman

Helen Meyer

image

Whenever comics history discusses Dr. Frederic Wertham and the Kefauver hearings on “juvenile delinquency”, EC publisher Bill Gaines is lionized as the only person in the comics industry who stood up to and demanded to be heard. That, my friends, is what we call a damn lie. Helen Meyer was the publisher of Dell Publications and was instrumental in securing the Disney, Warner Brothers, Little Lulu, and Popeye licenses for Dell’s comics line. What follows is from Meyer’s testimony:

We must give our American children proper credit for their good taste in their support of good comics. What better evidence can we give than facts and figures…Dell’s average comic sale is 800,000 copies per issue. Most crime and horror comic sales are under 250,000 copies. Of the first 25 largest selling magazines on newsstands - this includes Ladies Home Journal, Saturday Evening Post, Life, and so forth ─ 11 titles are Dell comics…With the least amount of titles, or 15 percent of all titles published by the entire industry; Dell can account for a sale of approximately 32 percent, and we don’t publish a crime or horror comic.

Dr. Wertham, for some strange reason, is intent on condemning the entire industry. He refuses to acknowledge that other types of comics are not only published, but are better supported by children than crime and horror comics. I hope that his motivation is not a selfish one in his crusade against comics. Yet, in the extensive research he tells us he has made on comics, why does he ignore the good comics? Dell isn’t alone in publishing good comics. There are numerous outstanding titles published by other publishers, such as Blondie, Archie, Dennis the Menace, and so forth. Why does he feel that he must condemn the entire industry? Could it be that he feels he has a better case against comics by recognizing the bad and ignoring the good?

Meyer was made CEO of Dell Publications in the early 1950s and remained so until its sale to Doubleday in 1976.

Ruth Atkinson

image

Either created or co-created the long-running Marvel Comics characters Millie the Model and Patsy Walker. Comics history is cruel to the pioneers of genres that have fallen out of favor, but both Patsy and Millie kept Marvel afloat in the 1950s. Even amid the Marvel superhero revival of the 1960s, Millie the Model comics were still among the top 100 series circulated each year, bringing in almost $220k at its peak that decade in 1965—equal to almost $1.7 million today.

Roberta Strauss Feuerlicht

image

Feuerlicht was the Editor-in-Chief of Classics Illustrated as well as an acclaimed historian. She began working at Gilberton, the publishers of Classics Illustrated, as an assistant editor in 1953. By then end of her tenure in 1961, she had been made Editor-in-Chief and created spin-off titles like Classics Illustrated Junior and other non-fiction comics like The World Around Us. She was known around the Gilberton offices as “Roberta the Conqueror”.

Honorable Mentions

  • Ruth Roche: Friedman lists Jerry Iger (#6), who with Will Eisner (#7) founded the Eisner-Iger shop. He leaves out Ruth Roche, his later business partner. Roche started as a writer at the Eisner-Iger studio in 1940. She soon became Iger’s associate editor; later they became business partners, and the studio became the Roche-Iger studio. She stayed with the Roche-Iger studio until it ceased publication in 1961.
  • Marion McDermott was an editor for St. John publications, including one of the first graphic novels ever produced, It Rhymes With Lust. She also edited such titles as Teen-Age Temptations, Teen-Age Romances, Authentic Police Cases, and Fightin’ Marines. Artist Ric Estrada credits her encouragement for helping him develop his style
  • Joan Bacchus. Though her first attributable published comics were in 1966 as part of the Black history series Golden Legacy, it is very likely she contributed, under her maiden name “Cooper”, to 1947’s All-Negro Comics, making her the first African-American woman published in a comic book.
  • Patricia Highsmith. Though best known as a thriller novelist, Highsmith’s only “honest” job her whole life was writing comics for various companies including Timely (Marvel) Comics!

comixology:

A comiXologist Recommends:
Kate Kasenow recommends Princess Ugg #1

Ted Naifeh is already known for fantastic tales that throw fantasy tropes out the nearest window, but Princess Ugg #1, published by onipress, takes it up a notch, introducing us to a new princess that doesn’t seem to know the meaning of the word…yet.

At story’s beginning, we meet Ügla, Princess of Grimmeria, daughter of warriors, and stranger to luxury. Simultaneously, we’re given a glimpse of the Princess of Atraesca, but we need only this glimpse to see that this maiden fair is everything the stereotypical princess should be—the complete opposite of Ügla. The entire issue focuses on the dichotomy of these two girls, who are to attend the same educational institution, setting up a story that will surely be full of action as well as hijinks.

Naifeh’s writing is mythic in its scope but lively in its tone and each character speaks with a unique voice. What really shines throughout this issue is Naifeh’s unique artistic style, which illustrates the tiniest details beautifully. Warren Wucinich’s colors compliment both the story and the world with vibrant palettes and touches of atmosphere that draw us in, panel by panel, to this new world.

If the delivery of this first issue’s story is any indication, this series promises to be both fun and illuminating. Much like his previous works, such as the Courtney Crumrin series, Naifeh is sure to focus on the virtues his characters will learn from one another, though not in ways we might suspect.

Follow their adventure here for more action from the wee bonny berserker, Princess Ugg!

[Read Princess Ugg #1 Here!]

For fans of: action, female leads, fantasy

Kate Kasenow is a comics artist from Indiana currently living in Manhattan. She works at ComiXology as a Lead Digital Editor and spends most of her spare time re-reading J. R. R. Tolkien.

So the Hulk was this classic male power fantasy. It’s like, most of the people reading comic books were these people like me who were just these little kids getting the shit kicked out of them every day… And so then they created She-Huk, right? Who was still smart… I think She-Hulk is the chick that you could fuck if you were Hulk, you know what I’m saying? … She-Hulk was the extension of the male power fantasy. So it’s like if I’m going to be this geek who becomes the Hulk then let’s create a giant green porn star that only the Hulk could fuck.

Man of Steel Sequel Writer David Goyer Calls Marvel’s She-Hulk “A Giant Green Porn Star,” Insults Geeks

FLAMES! ON THE SIDE OF MY FACE!

(via themarysue)

We interrupt our regularly scheduled programming to bring you David Goyer making the list of People Who Are Dead To Me.  

Like I need another reason not to see your shitty Superman movie.

(via jenniferwaltersesq)

Davic Goyer, demonstrating why he should not be allowed to represent superheroes in any way.

Hulk and the wider Hulk mythos have never been about generic male power fantasies; they’re about inhibition and finding strength in the secrets sides of ourselves that we hide. Bruce Banner is the anger that weak, nerdy kids have t choke down because if they ever express it they’ll get the crap beaten out of them. Bruce Banner unleashes that repressed side and it makes him powerful, but it also has severe consequences.

She-Hulk is the same concept, except She-Hulk is about what nerdy women repress: Our confidence, our feelings of attractiveness, our human. Jennifer Walters goes from a retiring, academic young woman with a need to please everyone to a enormous, sexy, funny green amazon who revels in physical delights. Jenn Walters is all about her job, and worrying about others; She-Hulk watches out for herself. Jenn restrains her emotions out of respect for others; She-Hulk wears her heart on her sleeve.

She-Hulk is NOT about porn, or being the Hulk’s goddamned girlfriend. She’s about revealing what women hide, and being stronger for it even if the wider world hates it.

(via rambleonamazon)

(via gwenfrankenstien)

SHE’S HIS COUSIN. I mean, it’s a disgusting thing to say but it’s also essentially inaccurate, because if you’re going to give Hulk a girlfriend he won’t break, you don’t make it HIS COUSIN.

In actuality, the reason She-Hulk was created was that the Hulk television show was taking off in a huge way, and Marvel wanted to ensure that they owned the rights to a female Hulk should one be written into the show, because a similar issue had previously arisen with the Bionic Man and the Bionic Woman. Stan Lee personally created her as a legal move.

Which is not perhaps the most glamorous or feminist of reasons for her to exist, but for Christ’s sake, it’s not so Hulk has someone to fuck. BECAUSE SHE’S HIS COUSIN.

Show of hands who’s shocked this guy is working for DC.

*cricket chirp*

That’s what I thought.

(via humantrampoline85)

I’ve been reading through the original Savage She-Hulk comics, and while all the above is true, I feel the need to point out that she never comes off as a sex object. Not once. She-Hulk is Jen’s one outlet for all the bottled-up anger she has at being treated like a silly little woman, despite having a law degree and consistently holding her own in court—by the ADA, by her clients, even by her own father. Jen Walters is constantly underestimated and belittled and undermined. And she fights back, in her own ways, even though they don’t involve smashing things. Even She-Hulk herself gets shit-talked by the male characters; she’s considered dangerous, with a heaping dollop of the implication that she’s promiscuous (because obviously that’s the worst thing a woman can ever be).

And although there are many problems with that initial run (Marvel’s understanding of race relations, even in 1980, was, uh, not good, shall we say), I love it because not only do we see She-Hulk responding to sexist bullshit in a way that makes us root for her, we’re meant to. Whatever her origins, that comic makes it clear as day that the way Jennifer Walters is treated, and the way She-Hulk is perceived, is not okay, and that being strong doesn’t mean the same thing for every person.

Anyway, I hope David Goyer gets bitten to death by a million vampire fleas. What a fucking tool.

(via americachavez)

And let us not forget that for years, Jennifer was the one who retained her intelligence when Hulked out while Bruce remained dominated by his atavism until the writers got bored with just smashing things. Sadly however, slutshaming Jennifer for and defining her by her sexuality seems par for the course in a certain segment of the community.

Even with the Rulks, the fundamental difference remains: being a Hulk is about having the freedom to express your might, being a She-Hulk is about having the might to express your freedom.