Fuck Yeah Warrior Women
[ Description: A colour image of a barbarian woman with pale skin decorated with tattoos that match her long red hair. She wears only a pair of leather boots, armoured loincloth, a pair of bracers and a shoulder guard. She strides towards the viewer, a sword strapped on her back and a large axe in her hands. ]

[ Description: A colour image of a barbarian woman with pale skin decorated with tattoos that match her long red hair. She wears only a pair of leather boots, armoured loincloth, a pair of bracers and a shoulder guard. She strides towards the viewer, a sword strapped on her back and a large axe in her hands. ]

[ Images: A photoset showing a variety of coloured paintings and drawings, and black & white photos all depicting a common theme: two women of Western Society stripped naked to the waist, engaging in a duel. The primary image is a drawing that has a distinctly 1920s vibe to it, showing a woman with short dark hair beneath a sblue skull cap, with a matching skirt trimmed with white fur that in turn matches her stole and gloves. She faces off against a woman in ridiculous red culottes that are covered in feathers matching the trim of the big broad-brimmed hat that obscures her features, elbow-length gloves and silly white scarf. They’re both pale skinned, and with their contrasting wardrobes are doubtlessly meant to be terribly symbolic of something. ]

brofisting:

otterbeans:

gingerhaze:

walklikeaghost:

ganbattesisyphus:

tumblino:

ornamentedbeing:

Topless dueling?

I know it’s a long text but it’s worth the read!

The most intriguing duel fought between women, and the sole one that featured exposed breasts, took place in August 1892 in Verduz, the capitol of Liechtenstein, between Princess Pauline Metternich and the Countess Kielmannsegg. It has gone down in history as the first “emancipated duel” because all parties involved, including the principals and their seconds were female… Before the proceedings began, the baroness pointed out that many insignificant injuries in duels often became septic due to strips of clothing being driven into the wound by the point of a sword. To counter this danger she prudently suggested that both parties should fight stripped of any garments above the waist. Certainly, Baroness Lubinska was ahead of her time, taking an even more radical take on the (at the time) widely dismissed theories of British surgeon Joseph Lister, who in 1870 revolutionized surgical procedures with the introduction of antiseptic. 

With the precautions Baroness Lubinska recommended, the topless women duelists were less likely to suffer from an infection; indeed, it was a smart idea to fight semiclad. Given the practicality of the baroness’ suggestion and the “emancipated” nature of the duel, it was agreed that the women would disrobe—after all, there would be no men present to ogle them. For the women, the decision to unbutton the tops of their dresses was not sexual; it was simply a way of preventing a duel of first blood from becoming a duel to the death.

… 

It is humorous that most recounts of this historic event fail to mention two important things: the winner of the duel (Princess Metternich) and the reason why the women came to arms in the first place—they disagreed over the floral arrangements for an upcoming musical exhibition.

^ best part of the entire article. 

tumblino:

words fail me at describing how perfect everything about this post is.

This is what happens next time bitches try and mess with my floral arrangements.

I’m curious as to the selections of said floral arrangements…

This is the best thing I’ve ever read ever.

The first rule of topless victorian ladies swordfighting club is that topless victorian ladies swordfighting club is not to be mentioned in mixed company.

The second rule is naught but an emphatic repeating of the first.

The second rule is naught but an emphatic repeating for the first!!

Spoiler, I’m drawing topless swordfighting soon.