Fuck Yeah Warrior Women
notpulpcovers:

 Jill Trent, Science Sleuth!
Superdames Comics Contest winners announced here

notpulpcovers:

 Jill Trent, Science Sleuth!

Superdames Comics Contest winners announced here

comicsalliance:

BATGIRL #35 REVIEW: MAKING OUT, DRESSING UP, AND DEFEATING THE FORCES OF MISOGYNY
By Juliet Kahn
Barbara Gordon is for girls. This truth has been obscured over the years, most notably in the Batman: The Killing Joke, in which the classic Batgirl was shot, sexually abused and paralyzed by the Joker and taken out of costume for decades. But just as Superman stands for unimpeachable hope and Batman for rigid justice, Batgirl stands for girls doing what the hell they want. From the moment she debuted as part of the classic BatmanTV show of the 1960s, this was clear: she was a librarian, she rode a motorcycle decorated with chiffon ruffles, and she did not give a damn that Batman wanted her to hang up the glittery puple cape and cowl. She was no sweet-tempered Kyptonian cousin, no kid sister, and no swooning girlfriend. As Mike Madrid detailed in The Supergirls: Fashion, Feminism, Fantasy, and the History of Comic Book Heroines, “Batgirl is a female Batman can actually regard as a brilliant peer and a partner in the war on crime, the same way he would a male.”
In her best adventures, this ember at the core of her character is stoked to a roaring flame—her time as Oracle, the fan-favorite super-hacker and enduringly powerful symbol for disabled persons in superhero comics; her portrayal as part of the Gotham Girls webseries and Batman: The Animated Series; and Scott Beatty & Chuck Dixon and Marcos Martin’s Batgirl: Year One come to mind. But these moments are brief, because as we all know, girls don’t read comics. Mostly, Barbara—the true Barbara, as all our favorite interpretations of these imprecise characters are the “true” ones—has lain in wait, a winking promise in the hands of a good-enough creative team. I’ve waited too. I’ve waited through mediocre art and ill-chosen storylines and a reboot I’m still not unequivocally behind. Today, as vibrantly portrayed by Cameron Stewart, Brenden Fletcher. Babs Tarr andMaris Wicks, she has arrived in DC’s Batgirl #35.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

BATGIRL #35 REVIEW: MAKING OUT, DRESSING UP, AND DEFEATING THE FORCES OF MISOGYNY

By Juliet Kahn

Barbara Gordon is for girls. This truth has been obscured over the years, most notably in the Batman: The Killing Joke, in which the classic Batgirl was shot, sexually abused and paralyzed by the Joker and taken out of costume for decades. But just as Superman stands for unimpeachable hope and Batman for rigid justice, Batgirl stands for girls doing what the hell they want. From the moment she debuted as part of the classic BatmanTV show of the 1960s, this was clear: she was a librarian, she rode a motorcycle decorated with chiffon ruffles, and she did not give a damn that Batman wanted her to hang up the glittery puple cape and cowl. She was no sweet-tempered Kyptonian cousin, no kid sister, and no swooning girlfriend. As Mike Madrid detailed in The Supergirls: Fashion, Feminism, Fantasy, and the History of Comic Book Heroines, “Batgirl is a female Batman can actually regard as a brilliant peer and a partner in the war on crime, the same way he would a male.”

In her best adventures, this ember at the core of her character is stoked to a roaring flame—her time as Oracle, the fan-favorite super-hacker and enduringly powerful symbol for disabled persons in superhero comics; her portrayal as part of the Gotham Girls webseries and Batman: The Animated Series; and Scott Beatty & Chuck Dixon and Marcos Martin’s Batgirl: Year One come to mind. But these moments are brief, because as we all know, girls don’t read comics. Mostly, Barbara—the true Barbara, as all our favorite interpretations of these imprecise characters are the “true” ones—has lain in wait, a winking promise in the hands of a good-enough creative team. I’ve waited too. I’ve waited through mediocre art and ill-chosen storylines and a reboot I’m still not unequivocally behind. Today, as vibrantly portrayed by Cameron StewartBrenden FletcherBabs Tarr andMaris Wicks, she has arrived in DC’s Batgirl #35.

READ MORE

heroineimages:

"I don’t want you to go to hell. I want you to sit at the feet of the gods, looking down on your city. I want you to watch your city grow and prosper without you. I want you to see the great things I help your people accomplish—the same people you convinced yourself you were protecting from me. And I want you to spend eternity knowing you could have been a part of it." —Queen Viarra

heroineimages:

"I don’t want you to go to hell. I want you to sit at the feet of the gods, looking down on your city. I want you to watch your city grow and prosper without you. I want you to see the great things I help your people accomplish—the same people you convinced yourself you were protecting from me. And I want you to spend eternity knowing you could have been a part of it." —Queen Viarra

scifi-fantasy-horror:

by LE LONG
char-portraits:

Front cover for the UK & ANZ edition of THRONE OF GLASS

foodandcosplay:

London Film And Comic Con - July 2014

Captain America

Cosplayer: Lucy Saxon [Twitter] [Facebook] [Tumblr]

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You can find more photos at

[Tumblr] [Facebook] [Twitter] [Flickr]

runicbasso:

blackfashion:

wocinsolidarity:

storyofagayboy:

LESBIAN JUDGE WILL NOT WED STRAIGHT COUPLES
It’s nothing personal, but Dallas County judge Tonya Parker does not perform wedding ceremonies for heterosexual couples looking to tie the knot. What is her reason? The state of Texas, along with 30 other states, does not currently allow same-sex marriage. Despite recent victories in places like Oregon and Pennsylvania, many states are still in court over the issue leading this openly gay judge to politely turn away couples until marriage is equal.
In an interview with the Dallas Voice, Parker said ,“I’m sorry. I don’t perform marriage ceremonies because we are in a state that does not have marriage equality, and until it does, I am not going to partially apply the law to one group of people that doesn’t apply to another group of people.”
While some are outraged, many applaud Parker, pointing out that same-sex couples have been denied marriages for years and that this is just an ironic dose of how homosexuals are treated.

!

TURNUP

Hah! 

runicbasso:

blackfashion:

wocinsolidarity:

storyofagayboy:

LESBIAN JUDGE WILL NOT WED STRAIGHT COUPLES

It’s nothing personal, but Dallas County judge Tonya Parker does not perform wedding ceremonies for heterosexual couples looking to tie the knot. What is her reason? The state of Texas, along with 30 other states, does not currently allow same-sex marriage. Despite recent victories in places like Oregon and Pennsylvania, many states are still in court over the issue leading this openly gay judge to politely turn away couples until marriage is equal.

In an interview with the Dallas Voice, Parker said ,“I’m sorry. I don’t perform marriage ceremonies because we are in a state that does not have marriage equality, and until it does, I am not going to partially apply the law to one group of people that doesn’t apply to another group of people.”

While some are outraged, many applaud Parker, pointing out that same-sex couples have been denied marriages for years and that this is just an ironic dose of how homosexuals are treated.

!

TURNUP

Hah! 

Diablo III  +  Female Classes 

ericscissorhands:

"Some women are lost in the fire. Some women are built from it."