Fuck Yeah Warrior Women
agrownupgeekgirl:

Joan Of Arc 2000 likes by Orpheelin
thetygre:

EON: Battlefield by anotherwanderer

starwars:

See how Hera takes care of business in this new preview clip that aired during today’s WonderCon panel.

infinitemachine:

Character of the Day: Nordic-Warrior-sketch by Adrian-W
heroineimages:

Shadow of the Dragon, by Leo Black
I know I use the word ‘refreshing’ a lot when contrasting some of the effective adventuring attire with some of the less believable stuff, but I think it is the most effective word to describe how I feel seeing characters like the lovely, crimson-haired mage in Leo’s painting. As well as being smartly outfitted, she has a competent, intelligent air that I find far more alluring than the sultriest look from the buxomest elf sorceress.
(Click for full discussion)

heroineimages:

Shadow of the Dragon, by Leo Black

I know I use the word ‘refreshing’ a lot when contrasting some of the effective adventuring attire with some of the less believable stuff, but I think it is the most effective word to describe how I feel seeing characters like the lovely, crimson-haired mage in Leo’s painting. As well as being smartly outfitted, she has a competent, intelligent air that I find far more alluring than the sultriest look from the buxomest elf sorceress.

(Click for full discussion)

hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

starwars:

Just in time for Con Season, Dave Filoni has a few tips for making a Hera costume from Star Wars Rebels. 

starwars:

Just in time for Con Season, Dave Filoni has a few tips for making a Hera costume from Star Wars Rebels. 

playsetsapp:

dragonagefrance:

Attack on Castle Cousland.
Artist : http://ranmacmh.deviantart.com/

Oh wow

freedominwickedness:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

WHOSOEVER HOLDS THIS HAMMER, IF SHE BE WORTHY, SHALL POSSESS THE POWER OF THOR.

ACTUAL GODDESS NATASHA ROMANOV

I always knew she was one :D

As is so often true of comics, a lot of the awesome is in the details. Natasha can’t move the Hammer when she first reaches it. What makes her worthy at the end when she apparently wasn’t worthy just seconds before? Look at panels 2-3 again. Natasha’s got that big ogre right on top of her with his club already going back to strike … and instead of shooting it to save herself, she uses her last shot to bring down the flying reptile that’s chasing that fleeing shuttle. That act of self-sacrifice in the face of certain death is what made her worthy.

Princesses Playing DnD by madam-marla