Fuck Yeah Warrior Women
northstarfan:

onipress:

The color cover for PRINCESS UGG #1 by Courtney Crumrin’s Ted Naifeh and Warren Wucinich!

From the site:

Within the fairy-tale kingdom of Atraesca lies the prestigious Princess Academy, where young royals from all the five kingdoms come to get their education. But they’ve never before seen the like of Princess Ülga of Grimmeria. Armed with axe and sword, riding her war mammoth through the city gates, Ülga has come in search of schooling. But this barbarian princess might just end up schooling the people of Atraesca before that happens!
Format: Single, StandardContent Rating: T (Teen)Available: Jun 4, 2014 Diamond™ Order Code:  APR14 1284

Why yes, I think I can find four spare bucks lying around come June.

northstarfan:

onipress:

The color cover for PRINCESS UGG #1 by Courtney Crumrin’s Ted Naifeh and Warren Wucinich!

From the site:

Within the fairy-tale kingdom of Atraesca lies the prestigious Princess Academy, where young royals from all the five kingdoms come to get their education. But they’ve never before seen the like of Princess Ülga of Grimmeria. Armed with axe and sword, riding her war mammoth through the city gates, Ülga has come in search of schooling. But this barbarian princess might just end up schooling the people of Atraesca before that happens!

Format: Single, Standard
Content Rating: T (Teen)
Available: Jun 4, 2014

Diamond™ Order Code: APR14 1284

Why yes, I think I can find four spare bucks lying around come June.

unatheblade:

inthedarkarcade:

UNA the Blade in The Pyre (Part One)

An army, too large to resist, is marching upon an ancient port city. Its walls and towers stand like solemn sentinels in vigil, their shadows lengthening one final time. In the distance, the wheels of twilight technology move across the sands, singular in their purpose. As the citizens load on to ships, desperately fleeing this dread advance, the buzzards circle like black flags, overhead.

A few will not leave, however. Having too much to lose, or having lost it all already, a few will remain and face the coming night, together.

I wrote and illustrated this comic over the course of a week. Please note that whilst I did that, I own none of the characters or the setting. This is most definitely an unsolicited fan comic. Una the Blade is helmed by Steve LeCouilliard and has a team of wonderful artists working on the project as we speak. You can find examples of the great work being done, over here: http://unatheblade.tumblr.com/

Pablo did an absolutely amazing job with this. I’m incredibly honored to have inspired it.

matahitorigoto:

Outlaw by Greg Opalinski
http://gregopalinski.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Outlaw_by_Greg_Opalinski1.jpg
agrownupgeekgirl:

Joan Of Arc 2000 likes by Orpheelin
thetygre:

EON: Battlefield by anotherwanderer

starwars:

See how Hera takes care of business in this new preview clip that aired during today’s WonderCon panel.

infinitemachine:

Character of the Day: Nordic-Warrior-sketch by Adrian-W
heroineimages:

Shadow of the Dragon, by Leo Black
I know I use the word ‘refreshing’ a lot when contrasting some of the effective adventuring attire with some of the less believable stuff, but I think it is the most effective word to describe how I feel seeing characters like the lovely, crimson-haired mage in Leo’s painting. As well as being smartly outfitted, she has a competent, intelligent air that I find far more alluring than the sultriest look from the buxomest elf sorceress.
(Click for full discussion)

heroineimages:

Shadow of the Dragon, by Leo Black

I know I use the word ‘refreshing’ a lot when contrasting some of the effective adventuring attire with some of the less believable stuff, but I think it is the most effective word to describe how I feel seeing characters like the lovely, crimson-haired mage in Leo’s painting. As well as being smartly outfitted, she has a competent, intelligent air that I find far more alluring than the sultriest look from the buxomest elf sorceress.

(Click for full discussion)

hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

hollabackboston:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.